Recently, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued the instructions for Forms 1094/1095 for the 2017 tax year, announced PCORI fees for 2017-18, and announced cost-of-living adjustments for 2018. The IRS provided additional guidance on leave-based donation programs’ tax treatment and released an information letter on COBRA and Medicare. Here’s a recap of these actions for your reference.IRS Announces Cost-of-Living Adjustments for 2018

The IRS released Revenue Procedures 2017-58 and Notice 2017-64 to announce cost-of-living adjustments for 2018. For example, the dollar limit on voluntary employee salary reductions for contributions to health flexible spending accounts (FSAs) is $2,650, for taxable years beginning with 2018.

Request UBA’s 2018 desk reference card with an at-a glance summary of the various limits.

IRS Announces PCORI Fee for 2017-18

The IRS announced the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) fee for 2017-18. The fee is $1.00 per covered life in the first year the fee is in effect. The fee is $2.00 per covered life in the second year. In the third through seventh years, the fee is $2.00, adjusted for medical inflation, per covered life.

For plan years that end on or after October 1, 2016, and before October 1, 2017, the indexed fee is $2.26. For plan years that end on or after October 1, 2017, and before October 1, 2018, the indexed fee is $2.39.

For more information, view UBA’s FAQ on the PCORI Fee.

IRS Provides Additional Guidance on Leave-Based Donation Programs’ Tax Treatment

Last month, the IRS provided guidance for employers who adopt leave-based donation programs to provide charitable relief for victims of Hurricane and Tropical Storm Irma. This month, the IRS issued Notice 2017-62 which extends the guidance to employers’ programs adopted for the relief of victims of Hurricane and Tropical Storm Maria.

These leave-based donation programs allow employees to forgo vacation, sick, or personal leave in exchange for cash payments that the employer will make to charitable organizations described under Internal Revenue Code Section 170(c).

The employer’s cash payments will not constitute gross income or wages of the employees if paid before January 1, 2019, to the Section 170(c) charitable organizations for the relief of victims of Hurricane or Tropical Storm Maria. Employers do not need to include these payments in Box 1, 3, or 5 of an employee’s Form W-2.

IRS Releases Information Letter on COBRA and Medicare

The IRS released Information Letter 2017-0022 that explains that a covered employee’s spouse can receive COBRA continuation coverage for up to 36 months if the employee became entitled to Medicare benefits before employment termination. In this case, the spouse’s maximum COBRA continuation period ends the later of: 36 months after the employee’s Medicare entitlement, or 18 months (or 29 months if there is a disability extension) after the employment termination.

 

By Danielle Capilla
Originally Published By United Benefit Advisors

The IRS has released drafts of the forms and instructions that employers will use for 2017 reporting under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It is expected that when the IRS releases final versions, the material will be virtually identical to the drafts.

Applicable large employers (ALEs) will use the following:

Employers that self-fund a minimum essential coverage plan will use the following:

Background

Applicable large employers (ALEs), who generally are entities that employed 50 or more full-time and full-time-equivalent employees in the prior year, are required to report information about the health coverage they offer or do not offer to certain employees. To meet this reporting requirement, the ALE furnishes Form 1095-C to the employee or former employee and files copies, along with transmittal Form 1094-C, with the IRS.

Employers, regardless of size, that sponsor a self-funded (self-insured) health plan providing minimum essential coverage are required to report coverage information about enrollees. To meet this reporting requirement, the employer furnishes Form 1095-B to the primary enrollee and files copies, along with transmittal Form 1094-B, with the IRS. Self-funded employers who also are ALEs may use Forms 1095-C and 1094-C in lieu of Forms 1095-B and 1094-B.

Information is reported on a calendar-year basis regardless of the employer’s health plan year or fiscal year.

Changes for 2017

The 2017 forms and instructions are similar to the 2016 materials, although there are some changes for items that no longer apply or to simplify or clarify the information. Some of the changes include:

  • Removing references to transition relief options that are no longer available to ALEs.
  • Confirming the multiemployer interim relief rule remains in place for ALEs that contribute to a multiemployer plan (e.g., union trust).
  • Updating references for items that have been adjusted for inflation, such as the affordability percentage (9.69 percent for 2017).
  • Adding a note in the instructions for Form 1095-C, line 16, stating that “There is no specific code to enter on line 16 to indicate that a full-time employee offered coverage either did not enroll in the coverage or waived the coverage.”

In general, the forms and instructions are very similar to the versions used last year. Since the reporting requirements have been in place for several years now, employers and their advisors should have little trouble in working with the new materials for 2017.

Due Dates

The due date to furnish 2017 forms to individuals is January 31, 2018, while the due date to file copies with the IRS, including the appropriate transmittal form, will depend on whether the employer files electronically or by paper. Entities that provide 250 or more forms to individuals are required to file electronically with the IRS.

The due dates for 2017 reporting are:

  • January 31, 2018: Deadline to furnish 2017 Form 1095-C (or 1095-B, if applicable) to employees and individuals.
  • February 28, 2018: Deadline for paper filing of all 2017 Forms 1095-C and 1095-B, along with transmittal form 1094-C or 1094-B, with the IRS.
  • April 2, 2018: Deadline for electronic filing of all 2017 Forms 1095-C and 1095-B, along with transmittal form 1094-C or 1094-B, with the IRS. (April 2 is the first business day following the usual due date of March 31.)

Summary

Employers are encouraged to work with experienced vendors, tax advisors, and payroll administrators to review how the ACA reporting requirements apply to their situation. The required forms are important IRS documents and preparers should use the same level of care that would apply to employee W-2s.

 

Originally Published By ThinkHR.com

A fixed indemnity health plan pays a specific amount of cash for certain health-related events (for example, $40 per office visit or $100 per hospital day). The amount paid is neither related to the medical expense incurred, nor coordinated with other health coverage. Further, a fixed indemnity health plan is considered an “excepted benefit.”

Under HIPAA, fixed dollar indemnity policies are excepted benefits if they are offered as “independent, non-coordinated benefits.” Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), excepted benefits are not subject to the ACA’s health insurance requirements or prohibitions (for example, annual and lifetime dollar limits, out-of-pocket limits, requiring individual and small-group policies to cover ten essential health benefits, etc.). This means that excepted benefit policies can exclude preexisting conditions, can have dollar limits, and do not legally have to guarantee renewal when the coverage is cancelled.

Further, under the ACA, excepted benefits are not minimum essential coverage so a large employer cannot comply with its employer shared responsibility obligations by offering only fixed indemnity coverage to its full-time employees.

Some examples of fixed indemnity health plans are AFLAC or similar coverage, or cancer insurance policies.

Recently, the IRS released a Memorandum on the tax treatment of benefits paid by fixed indemnity health plans that addresses two questions:

  1. Are payments to an employee under an employer-provided fixed indemnity health plan excludible from the employee’s income under Internal Revenue Code §105?
  2. Are payments to an employee under an employer-provided fixed indemnity health plan excludible from the employee’s income under Internal Revenue Code §105 if the payments are made by salary reduction through a §125 cafeteria plan?

 

By Danielle Capilla, Originally Published By United Benefit Advisors

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), individuals are required to have health insurance while applicable large employers (ALEs) are required to offer health benefits to their full-time employees.

In order for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to verify that (1) individuals have the required minimum essential coverage, (2) individuals who request premium tax credits are entitled to them, and (3) ALEs are meeting their shared responsibility (play or pay) obligations, employers with 50 or more full-time or full-time equivalent employees and insurers will be required to report on the health coverage they offer. Similarly, insurers and employers with less than 50 full time employees but that have a self-funded plan also have reporting obligations. All of this reporting is done on IRS Forms 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C and 1095-C.

Final instructions for both the 1094-B and 1095-B and the 1094-C and 1095-C were released in September 2015, as were the final forms for 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C.

Form 1094-C is used in combination with Form 1095-C to determine employer shared responsibility penalties. It is often referred to as the “transmittal form” or “cover sheet.” IRS Form 1095-C will primarily be used to meet the Section 6056 reporting requirement, which relates to the employer shared responsibility/play or pay requirement. Information from Form 1095-C will also be used in determining whether an individual is eligible for a premium tax credit.

Form 1094-C contains information about the ALE, and is how an employer identifies as being part of a controlled group. It also has a section labeled “Certifications of Eligibility” and instructs employers to “select all that apply” with four boxes that can be checked. The section is often referred to as the “Line 22” question or boxes. Many employers find this section confusing and are unsure what, if any, boxes they should select. The boxes are labeled:

  1. Qualifying Offer Method
  2. Reserved
  3. Section 4980H Transition Relief
  4. 98% Offer Method

Different real world situations will lead an employer to select any combination of boxes on Line 22, including leaving all four boxes blank. Practically speaking, only employers who met the requirements of using code 1A on the 1095-C, offered coverage to virtually all employees, or qualified for transition relief in 2015 and had a non-calendar year plan will check any of the boxes on Line 22. Notably, employers who do not use the federal poverty level safe harbor for affordability will never select Box A, and corresponding with that, will never use codes 1A or 1I on Line 14 of a 1095-C form.

By Danielle Capilla, Originally Published By United Benefit Advisors

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently updated its longstanding Questions and Answers about Information Reporting by Employers on Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C that provides information on:

Generally, the Q&A describes when and how an employer reports its offers of coverage and describes the codes that employers should use when completing Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C for calendar year 2016 that are to be filed in 2017. The Q&A should be used in conjunction with the Instructions for Forms 1094-C and 1095-C which provide detailed information about completing the forms.

The updated Q&A provides information on COBRA reporting that had been left pending in earlier versions of the Q&A for the past year. UBA’s ACA Advisor “IRS Q&A About Employer Information Reporting on Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C” reviews the new information and explains other reporting obligations covered under the Q&A.

Reporting Offers of COBRA Continuation Coverage

An offer of COBRA continuation coverage that is made to a former employee due to termination of employment is not reported as an offer of coverage in Part II of Form 1095-C.

If the applicable large employer is required to complete a Form 1095-C for the former employee (because, for example, the individual was a full-time employee for one or more months of the year before terminating employment), the employer should use code 1H, No offer of coverage, on line 14 for any month that the former employee was offered COBRA continuation coverage. For those same months, the employer should use code 2A, Employee not employed during the month, on line 16 for each month in which the individual is not an employee (regardless of whether the former employee enrolled in the COBRA continuation coverage).

An employer that provides COBRA continuation coverage through a self-insured health plan generally must report that coverage for any former employee or family member who enrolls in that COBRA continuation coverage in Part III of the Form 1095-C. Also, the employer may report the coverage on Form 1095-B for any individual who was not an employee during the year and who separately elected the COBRA continuation coverage.

For more information on reporting offers of COBRA continuation coverage due to a reduction in hours (including examples), and self-insured health plan reporting of coverage of spouses and dependents who separately elect to receive COBRA continuation coverage—as well as a complete review of codes that employers should use when completing Forms 1094-C and 1095-C—view UBA’s ACA Advisor, “IRS Q&A About Employer Information Reporting on Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C”.

By Danielle Capilla
Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

Cafeteria plans, or plans governed by IRS Code Section 125, allow employers to help employees pay for expenses such as health insurance with pre-tax dollars. Employees are given a choice between a taxable benefit (cash) and two or more specified pre-tax qualified benefits, for example, health insurance. Employees are given the opportunity to select the benefits they want, just like an individual standing in the cafeteria line at lunch.

Only certain benefits can be offered through a cafeteria plan:

  • Coverage under an accident or health plan (which can include traditional health insurance, health maintenance organizations (HMOs), self-insured medical reimbursement plans, dental, vision, and more);
  • Dependent care assistance benefits or DCAPs
  • Group term life insurance
  • Paid time off, which allows employees the opportunity to buy or sell paid time off days
  • 401(k) contributions
  • Adoption assistance benefits
  • Health savings accounts or HSAs under IRS Code Section 223

Some employers want to offer other benefits through a cafeteria plan, but this is prohibited. Benefits that you cannot offer through a cafeteria plan include scholarships, group term life insurance for non-employees, transportation and other fringe benefits, long-term care, and health reimbursement arrangements (unless very specific rules are met by providing one in conjunction with a high deductible health plan). Benefits that defer compensation are also prohibited under cafeteria plan rules.

Cafeteria plans as a whole are not subject to ERISA, but all or some of the underlying benefits or components under the plan can be. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has also affected aspects of cafeteria plan administration.

Employees are allowed to choose the benefits they want by making elections. Only the employee can make elections, but they can make choices that cover other individuals such as spouses or dependents. Employees must be considered eligible by the plan to make elections. Elections, with an exception for new hires, must be prospective. Cafeteria plan selections are considered irrevocable and cannot be changed during the plan year, unless a permitted change in status occurs. There is an exception for mandatory two-year elections relating to dental or vision plans that meet certain requirements.

Plans may allow participants to change elections based on the following changes in status:

  • Change in marital status
  • Change in the number of dependents
  • Change in employment status
  • A dependent satisfying or ceasing to satisfy dependent eligibility requirements
  • Change in residence
  • Commencement or termination of adoption proceedings

Plans may also allow participants to change elections based on the following changes that are not a change in status but nonetheless can trigger an election change:

  • Significant cost changes
  • Significant curtailment (or reduction) of coverage
  • Addition or improvement of benefit package option
  • Change in coverage of spouse or dependent under another employer plan
  • Loss of certain other health coverage (such as government provided coverage, such as Medicaid)
  • Changes in 401(k) contributions (employees are free to change their 401(k) contributions whenever they wish, in accordance with the administrator’s change process)
  • HIPAA special enrollment rights (contains requirements for HIPAA subject plans)
  • COBRA qualifying event
  • Judgment, decrees, or orders
  • Entitlement to Medicare or Medicaid
  • Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leave
  • Pre-tax health savings account (HSA) contributions (employees are free to change their HSA contributions whenever they wish, in accordance with the their payroll/accounting department process)
  • Reduction of hours (new under the ACA)
  • Exchange/Marketplace enrollment (new under the ACA)

Together, the change in status events and other recognized changes are considered “permitted election change events.”

Common changes that do not constitute a permitted election change event are: a provider leaving a network (unless, based on very narrow circumstances, it resulted in a significant reduction of coverage), a legal separation (unless the separation leads to a loss of eligibility under the plan), commencement of a domestic partner relationship, or a change in financial condition.

There are some events not in the regulations that could allow an individual to make a mid-year election change, such as a mistake by the employer or employee, or needing to change elections in order to pass nondiscrimination tests. To make a change due to a mistake, there must be clear and convincing evidence that the mistake has been made. For instance, an individual might accidentally sign up for family coverage when they are single with no children, or an employer might withhold $100 dollars per pay period for a flexible spending arrangement (FSA) when the individual elected to withhold $50.

Plans are permitted to make automatic payroll election increases or decreases for insignificant amounts in the middle of the plan year, so long as automatic election language is in the plan documents. An “insignificant” amount is considered one percent or less.

Plans should consider which change in status events to allow, how to track change in status requests, and the time limit to impose on employees who wish to make an election.

Cafeteria plans are not required to allow employees to change their elections, but plans that do allow changes must follow IRS requirements. These requirements include consistency, plan document allowance, documentation, and timing of the election change. For complete details on each of these requirements—as well as numerous examples of change in status events, including scenarios involving employees or their spouses or dependents entering into domestic partnerships, ending periods of incarceration, losing or gaining TRICARE coverage, and cost changes to an employer health plan—request UBA’s ACA Advisor, “Cafeteria Plans: Qualifying Events and Changing Employee Elections”.

By Danielle Capilla
Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

Question: If an employee has a small health flexible spending account (FSA) balance with a carryover to the next year, and the employee chooses not to participate in the new FSA year, can the employer force the employee to use those funds so as not to incur additional administrative fees in the next plan year?

Answer: An employer can prevent “perpetual carryovers” by carefully drafting the cafeteria plan document with respect to carryover amounts. IRS guidance allows carryovers to be limited to individuals who have elected to participate in the health FSA in the next plan year. Health FSAs may also require that carryover amounts be forfeited if not used within a specified period of time, such as one year. Note that this plan design requires additional administration (to track the time limit for each carryover dollar, for instance) as well as ordering rules (e.g., will carryovers be used first?), so you will need to carefully review the cafeteria plan document. Under no circumstances are amounts returned to participants.

According to IRS guidance, a health FSA may limit the availability of the carryover of unused amounts (subject to the $500 limit) to individuals who have elected to participate in the health FSA in the next year, even if the ability to participate in that next year requires a minimum salary reduction election to the health FSA for that next year. For example, an employer sponsors a cafeteria plan offering a health FSA that permits up to $500 of unused health FSA amounts to be carried over to the next year in compliance with Notice 2013-71, but only if the employee participates in the health FSA during that next year. To participate in the health FSA, an employee must contribute a minimum of $60 ($5 per calendar month). As of December 31, 2016, Employee A and Employee B each have $25 remaining in their health FSA. Employee A elects to participate in the health FSA for 2017, making a $600 salary reduction election. Employee B elects not to participate in the health FSA for 2017. Employee A has $25 carried over to the health FSA for 2017, resulting in $625 available in the health FSA. Employee B forfeits the $25 as of December 31, 2016 and has no funds available in the health FSA thereafter. This arrangement is a permissible health FSA carryover feature under Notice 2013171. The IRS also clarifies that a health FSA may limit the ability to carry over unused amounts to a maximum period (subject to the $500 limit). For example, a health FSA can limit the ability to carry over unused amounts to one year. Thus, if an individual carried over $30 and did not elect any additional amounts for the next year, the health FSA may require forfeiture of any amount remaining at the end of that next year.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), all public Exchanges are required to notify employers when an employee is receiving a subsidy (tax credits and cost-sharing reductions) for individual health insurance purchased through an Exchange. According to the final rules published in August 2013, employers have the right, but are not required, to engage in an appeal process through the IRS if they feel an employee should not be receiving a subsidy because the employer offers minimum value, affordable coverage.

Some states began sending notices from public Exchanges indicating that one or more employees are currently receiving a subsidy in 2015, but the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that all federally-facilitated Exchanges will begin sending notices in 2016. Just because the employer receives a notice, it does not mean the employer will actually owe a penalty payment under Section 4980H.

Dan Bond, Principal, Compliancedashboard, offers this important commentary: “I think it’s important for employers to remember that just because they may receive one of these notices from the IRS telling them that one of their employees is receiving a subsidy on the exchange, it does not necessarily mean the employer has exposure to a penalty. There are various reasons that someone might have received a subsidy so the employer can use this notice to determine exactly why and whether or not they have any exposure. In fact, small employers will also receive these notices and they are not even subject to the employer shared responsibility mandate so they will not be subject to penalties, regardless.”

subsidy appeal chart

Appeal Form and Process
So long as the requirements in the final rules are met, each state Exchange is allowed to set up its own process and procedures. Information about how to file an appeal is usually included in the notice, but it may be necessary to check with the applicable Exchange to find out exactly how to handle the appeals process, the particulars of which are managed by each Exchange separately.

The form currently used by federally-facilitated Exchanges, as well as by eight states, may be found on Healthcare.gov (approximately half of the states are currently using this form and process). The forms and processes for all other states may be found by visiting a state’s Exchange site. The process generally involves filing a paper appeal, providing documentation, and in some cases participating in a hearing.

Conclusion
The employer does not have to appeal to avoid a penalty under Section 4980H, and penalties will not apply until after the employer reporting (via Forms 1094-C and 1095-C) is reconciled. There is some speculation that it may be more beneficial to appeal with the Exchange rather than waiting to appeal later with the IRS. This is a fairly new process, so the best approach for employers may remain somewhat unclear until the first year of employer reporting is completed.

Filing an appeal as soon as possible may help avoid hassles with the IRS and prevent the individual from receiving a subsidy for which they are ineligible. At the same time, although the appeals process does not appear to be a difficult one, it is possible that everything could be cleared up more quickly by simply communicating directly with the employee that they may be receiving the subsidy in error.

Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

 

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), individuals are required to have health insurance while applicable large employers (ALEs) are required to offer health benefits to their full-time employees. In order for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to verify that (1) individuals have the required minimum essential coverage, (2) individuals who request premium tax credits are entitled to them, and (3) ALEs are meeting their shared responsibility (play or pay) obligations, employers with 50 or more full-time or full-time equivalent employees and insurers will be required to report on the health coverage they offer. Final instructions for the 1094-B and 1095-B and the 1094-C and 1095-C forms were released in September 2016, as were the final forms for 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C. The reporting requirements are in Sections 6055 and 6056 of the ACA.

Reporting was first due in 2016, based on coverage in 2015. Reporting in 2017 will be based on coverage in 2016. All reporting will be for the calendar year, even for non-calendar year plans.

On November 18, 2016, the IRS issued Notice 2016-70, delaying the reporting deadlines in 2017 for the 1095-B and 1095-C forms to individuals. There is no delay for the 1094-C and 1094-B forms, or for forms due to the IRS.

Original Deadlines Delayed Deadlines
DUE TO THE IRS
The 1094-C, 1095-C, 1094-B, and 1085-B forms were originally due to the IRS by February 28, if filing on paper, or March 31, if filing electronically
Deadline to the IRS for all forms remains the same.
DUE TO EMPLOYEES
The 1095-C form was due to employees by January 31 of the year following the year to which the Form 1095-C relates.
DUE TO EMPLOYEES
The 1095-C form is now due to employees by March 2, 2017.
DUE TO INDIVIDUALS AND EMPLOYEES
The 1095-B form was due to the individual identified as the “responsible individual” on the form by January 31.
DUE TO INDIVIDUALS AND EMPLOYEES
The 1095-B form is now due to the individual identified as the “responsible individual” on the form by March 2, 2017.

 

For information on the extension process as well as the impact on individual taxpayers, view UBA’s ACA Advisor, “IRS Delay in 6055 and 6056 Reporting for 2017”.

For comprehensive highlights and detailed explanations of all forms and instructions for 6055/6056 reporting, including the 2016 updates and sample situations, request UBA’s 16-page ACA Advisor, “IRS Rleeases 2016 Forms and Instructions for 6055/6056 Reporting”.

Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

 

On October 27, 2016, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released Notice 2016-62 announcing cost-of-living adjustments affecting dollar limitations for pension plans and other retirement-related items for tax year 2017. Many pension plan limitations will not change in 2017 because the increase in the cost-of-living index did not meet the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. Some items, though, will see minor increases. The following is a summary of the limits for 2017.

For 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plans:

  • The elective deferral (contribution) limit remains unchanged at $18,000 for 2017.
  • The catch-up contribution limit for employees aged 50 and over who participate in these plans remains at $6,000 for 2017.

For individual retirement arrangements (IRAs):

  • The limit on annual contributions remains unchanged at $5,500 for 2017.
  • The additional catch-up contribution limit for individuals aged 50 and over is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $1,000 for 2017.

For simplified employee pension (SEP) IRAs and individual/solo 401(k) plans:

  • Elective deferrals increase to $54,000 for 2017, based on an annual compensation limit of $270,000 (up from the 2016 amounts of $53,000 and $265,000).
  • The minimum compensation that may be required for participation in a SEP remains unchanged at $600 for 2017.

For savings incentive match plan for employees (SIMPLE) IRAs:

  • The contribution limit on SIMPLE IRA retirement accounts remains unchanged at $12,500 for 2017.
  • The SIMPLE catch-up limit remains unchanged at $3,000 for 2017.

For defined benefit plans:

  • The basic limitation on the annual benefits under a defined benefit plan is increased to $215,000 for 2017 (from $210,000 for 2016).

Other changes:

  • Highly compensated and key employee thresholds:
    • The threshold for determining “highly compensated employees” remains unchanged at $120,000 for 2017.
    • The threshold for officers who are “key employees” in a top-heavy plan increases to $175,000 for 2017 (from $170,000 for 2016).
  • Social Security cost of living adjustment: In a separate announcement, the Social Security Administration stated that the taxable wage base will increase to $127,200 for 2017, an increase of $8,700 from the 2016 taxable wage base of $118,500. Thus, the maximum Social Security tax liability will increase for both employees and employers.

Originally published www.thinkhr.com

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