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Question: We have a new employee in our call center who has a service dog. She came to her interview and trained without the dog, but is now asking if she can bring her dog to work. Do we have to accommodate her request?

Answer: The first step will be to determine whether the dog is a trained “service animal” as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), or is an “emotional support animal.” A “service animal” is one that has been individually trained to work or perform specific tasks for an individual with a disability. The animal must be trained to take a specific action when needed to assist the person with the disability. Allowing an employee’s trained service animal is a form of reasonable accommodation.

However, pets used for emotional support are not considered service animals under the ADA as they are not trained to perform a specific task. Although some states and some local governments allow individuals to have emotional support animals in public places, the same may not hold true for allowing such animals in places of employment. You will need to contact your local government agency to see if such laws exist. If not, you may set a policy that prohibits pets in the workplace except for ADA-defined service animals.

Employers are limited on what they can ask an employee when it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal. Employers may only ask:

  1. Is the dog a service animal required because of a disability?
  2. What work or task has the dog been trained to perform?

In addition, employers are not permitted to ask for documentation for the dog, require that the dog demonstrate the task, or inquire as to the nature of the disability. The ADA does not require that trained service animals wear certain vests or collars indicating that they are service animals. Further, the ADA does not require the service animals to have a certificate of training.

Opening a dialogue with your employee about her need for the dog will provide you with guidance as to whether you need to allow her dog to remain with her at work. If another employee notifies you that he or she is allergic to dogs or dog dander, you may notify the employee with the service animal that due to the allergies of another employee, you cannot accommodate her request. However, you must engage in the interactive process with the employee with the service animal to consider other accommodations that would allow the dog to be with the employee.

Check with the Job Accommodation Network for resources to guide you in accommodating employees with service animals. If you do allow this employee to have her dog with her at work, remind her that she is responsible to ensure that her dog is always under her control and does not create a disruption to the work environment.

 

Originally posted on thinkhr.com

The quality of a therapeutic relationship depends on the ability of the healthcare provider to communicate effectively. The term “therapeutic communication” is often used in the field of nursing; however, the process isn’t limited to nursing. Other healthcare professionals, friends and family members of a patient can implement the strategies of communicating in a therapeutic manner. The ideal therapeutic exchange provides the patient with the confidence to play an active role in her care.

Facilitates Client Autonomy

Therapeutic communication techniques, such as active listening, infer autonomy or independence on the patient or client. Rather than making assumptions about the client who is almost a stranger, the healthcare professional facilitates therapeutic expression. The client, ideally, will then become more comfortable sharing potentially difficult information. The role of the healthcare professional is then to use this information to help the client to further investigate his own feelings and options. In the end, the client gains more confidence in making decisions regarding his care.

Creates a Nonjudgmental Environment

Perhaps the most important characteristic of a therapeutic relationship is the development of trust. Trust facilitates constructive communication; it also encourages confidence and autonomy. Being nonjudgmental is necessary in verbal and nonverbal communication. People are acutely adept at identifying nonverbal cues that may communicate something very different from what is said.

Provides The Professional With a Holistic View of Their Client

An individual does not usually exist without a network of family, friends and healthcare professionals. Therapeutic communication emphasizes a holistic view of a person and his network of people who provide support. A person’s individual perspective regarding his health and life is viewed through a lens built from the context of his experiences. Those experiences cannot be ignored when communicating in a way that is therapeutic. Within the therapeutic relationship, the individual is learning the skills of communication with other people in his life, ideally also improving those relationships.

Reduces Risk of Unconscious Influence By The Professional

It’s human nature to want to infer some part of yourself into an interaction; however, in order for therapeutic communication to occur, it’s important to temper your influence. Therapeutic communication requires maintaining an acute awareness of what is being said as well as any nonverbal cues. Communicating that you are open to hearing what a person has to say while folding your arms creates confusion and inconsistency that can mar a healthy interaction. Be aware of your tone of voice and any reactions.

Originally Published By LiveStrong.com

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